Tuesday, February 10, 2009

Win trip to Africa to cover story for NY Times

This Friday is the deadline for a journalism contest that will give one student the chance to travel to Africa with a New York Times columnist and produce stories and videos for The Times and YouTube.

"The Grand Prize is as follows: a trip with Nick Kristof, a round trip airplane ticket, all trip-related meals, lodging and transportation and other out-of-pocket expense of The New York Times╩╝ choosing," the announcement states. "The winner will also have an opportunity to submit for possible publication a regular report on NYTimes.com and in The New York Times newspaper. The Total ARV of the prizes is $4,500."

The contest is open to students at American universities - either undergraduates or graduate students - who are 18 years old or over.You can apply either with an essay or with a video, or both.

Application details are available online.

Location: New York, New York

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Wednesday, December 10, 2008

Modernizing your journalism job resume

Increasingly, media companies are asking for applications to be sent electronically: either via e-mail or by completing an online form.

If you're reading this blog post, surely you know how to e-mail a cover letter and attach your resume as a file to it. But how are you supposed to send your clips?

Electronically.

Scan and save your publication clips as PDFs that can be attached as e-mail files or uploaded to a website (like this). Upload broadcast clips to YouTube or (if over 10 minutes) Google Video and e-mail the links (like this). While a newspaper or station may have posted your materials on its website, those links often expire or cost money to access. So, make your own electronic copies of your work samples.

Better yet, create your own website and upload your portfolio to that. You can even convert your resume into a webpage. This way you won't inadvertently disqualify yourself from consideration for a job because an editor's using software that can't open your document file. Believe me, it happens. Moreover, you'll impress prospective bosses with your new media skills and separate yourself from other applicants.

For more advice, read my article on Applying for Journalism Jobs.

-Mark Grabowski

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Tuesday, September 16, 2008

YouTube offers $10,000 contest for student journalists

YouTube and the Pulitzer Center are holding a contest that allows non-professional, aspiring journalists the chance to tell stories that might not otherwise be covered by traditional media.

The contest, dubbed "Project: Report," consists of three rounds. In each round, reporters will be given an assignment to complete. Each of these assignments gives people an opportunity to report on the important individuals, issues, and communities in their lives that others do not yet know about. You can compete is just one round, although only those who compete in all three will be eligible for the grand prize.

Winners from each round will receive technology prizes from Sony VAIO and Intel, and the grand prize winner will be granted a $10,000 journalism fellowship with the Pulitzer Center to report on a story outside of their home country.

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